Skip to main content

Official blamed for murdering Oklahoma police boss in Florida


A community Oklahoma cop was accused of murdering his boss after what specialists depicted as a liquor filled fight in a Florida Panhandle lodging. 

The two men had been remaining at the Hilton on Pensacola Beach throughout the end of the week for a law implementation meeting, said Escambia County Sheriff's representative Amber Southard. 

Sooner or later early Sunday evening, inn security was called on the grounds that the two men were being troublesome, Southard said. Later that night, inn staff called the sheriff's area of expertise in light of the fact that the men were battling. 

"A genuine physical fight," she said. 

At the point when representatives showed up, they discovered Chief Lucky Miller dead, she stated, and there was no weapon. She included that liquor was included and that a post-mortem examination is in progress. 

An individual who picked up the telephone at a number related with Miller declined to remark and asked that The Associated Press not call once more. 

Michael Patrick Nealey, 49, was captured Monday morning and accused of killing Miller, as indicated by records. 

Mill operator was the police boss in Mannford, Oklahoma, a community around 20 miles (32 kilometers) west of Tulsa. It has a populace of around 3,200. 

Nealey was being held without bond at the Escambia County Jail. He's accused of manslaughter. A legal advisor for Nealey wasn't recorded on prison records and no extra subtleties were quickly accessible. 

Mill operator, 44, had been police boss since 2007. He and his significant other had three youngsters. 

"We are crushed by the news," Mayor Tyler Buttram said in the announcement. "If you don't mind keep the two families in your supplications as we work to push ahead." 

The town chairman has named another official as between time police boss. 

The gathering was to be held Monday to Wednesday at the inn, however it's indistinct on the off chance that it is as yet booked. An email to the association wasn't quickly returned. One of the moderators said his session had been dropped. A Mannford cop disclosed to The Tulsa World that the pair was in Florida to find out about death scene examinations. 

"Mike Nealey was our criminologist. Fortunate was a hands-on fellow, so he constantly needed to be there to learn things like that," Officer Jerry Ridley said. 

Brett Graves, the President of Carterson Public Safety, the organization that sorted out the occasion, said in an explanation that he was disheartened by the news. 

"We might want to stretch out our sympathies to the families and organization of those included." 

City hall leader Buttram said the two men were "the best of companions" and told The Associated Press that he can't understand what occurred in Florida. 

"That is the thing that makes everything so hard. We can't fold our heads over this," he said. "The city's simply staggered. The police office's paralyzed. Nothing bodes well, nothing includes." 

Comments