Skip to main content

Iran athlete who fled country wants to compete for Germany


Iran's solitary female Olympic medalist said she needs to vie for Germany in the wake of abandoning from her nation prior this month and impacting the "false reverence" of Iranian legislators. 

Kimia Alizadeh said she would like to proceed with her taekwondo profession in Germany while attempting to revamp her life. 

"Regardless of whether I don't make it to the Olympics, it doesn't make a difference since I have decided," Alizadeh said at a Friday meeting with writers at a taekwondo club. 

"I am certain that I will be made a decision by many, however I am only 21 years of age and can go to world competitions and future Olympics. Be that as it may, I will go all out to get the best outcome as of now also." 

Alizadeh won a bronze award in taekwondo at the 2016 Olympics in Rio de Janeiro, making her the principal Iranian female to decoration in the games. Her happiness went to disappointment over Tehran's hindrances forced on female competitors. 

She blamed the administration for sexism and censured making wearing the hijab obligatory in the Instagram post that reported she left the nation. She additionally blamed administrators for "lying" and "foul play" toward Iranian competitors. 

Alizadeh went to the Netherlands before going to Germany this week to meet with taekwondo authorities there. The German Taekwondo Union has shouted out for her remaining in the nation in what it calls an initial move toward her picking up nationality and getting qualified to go after Germany. 

"On the off chance that the German government helps me and I can experience this procedure as quick as could be expected under the circumstances, I may have the option to make it to the Olympics as well," she said. 

She purportedly got ideas to vie for the Netherlands, Canada, Belgium and Bulgaria. Numerous Iranian competitors have decided to leave the nation lately in the midst of government pressure. 

Alizadeh said wore everything the administration asked her to and "rehashed all that they guided me to state. ... None of us matter to them." 

In September, previous world judo champion Saeed Mollaei moved to Germany in the wake of strolling off the Iranian group at the big showdowns in Japan. He refered to pressure from Tehran to pull back from rivalry so as not to go up against an Israeli competitor. 

Alizadeh said she simply needs "a serene life," and she's not thinking back. 

"I have an incredible inclination to have settled on a choice for my life that would change my future," she said. "I think it isn't clear enough now and, in the years to come, I will comprehend what a decent choice I made."

Comments