Skip to main content

Mexico women protest after gruesome killing of Ingrid Escamilla


Many activists rushed to Mexico's presidential castle on Friday to challenge savagery against ladies, reciting "not one homicide more" and sprinkling one of its enormous, elaborate entryways with dark red paint and the words "femicide state". 

The warmed Valentine's Day exhibit, drove by ladies, originated from shock as of late over the killing of 25-year-old Ingrid Escamilla in Mexico City and the production of realistic photographs of her mangled carcass in papers. 

One nonconformist splash painted "INGRID" in tall pink letters on another royal residence entryway in tribute. Numerous members noticed that her demise was just the most recent model in a flood of severe killings of ladies that have been named "femicides". 

A normal of 10 ladies are killed a day in Mexico, and a year ago denoted another general murder record, official information appear. 

"It's not simply Ingrid. There are a great many femicides," said Lilia Florencio Guerrero, whose little girl was viciously murdered in 2017. "It fills us with outrage and fierceness." 

She approached President Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador, who was inside the castle as the fights proceeded, to accomplish more to stop the savagery. 

Others graffitied trademarks including "they are executing us" on the structure's dividers and launched out brilliant flares from jars of combustible shower paint. 

Inside the stately castle, where Lopez Obrador lives with his family, the president endeavored to console the activists during his morning news meeting. 

"I'm not covering my head in the sand ... The administration I speak to will consistently deal with guaranteeing the security of ladies," he stated, without itemizing new plans. 

Nonconformists additionally counseled the papers that distributed photographs of Escamilla's carcass, reciting, "the press is complicit". 

La Prensa, a paper that ran the horrifying picture on its spread, protected its record of writing about wrongdoing and murder, subjects it said the administration likes to stay silent. The paper likewise said it was available to conversation on altering its measures past lawful prerequisites. 

"We see today that it hasn't been adequate, and we've entered a procedure of more profound audit," the paper said in a first page explanation on Friday. 

Paper Pasala had filled almost its whole newspaper spread with the photograph, under the Valentine's Day-themed title text: "It was cupid's flaw". The spread started outrage at the bloody showcase, yet in addition the jovial tone over a wrongdoing for which Escamilla's local accomplice has been captured. 

Pasala editors didn't react to demands for comments.

Comments