Skip to main content

Latest Updates on Coronavirus


The latest on the pandemic
• per Johns Hopkins data, the amount of world cases is over 222,000, with about 9,100 deaths and upwards of 84,000 recoveries.

• Trump signs the Families First Coronavirus Response Act, which can provide paid sick and family leave for several Americans.

• Two members of Congress, Reps. Mario Diaz-Balart (R-Fla.) and Ben McAdams (D-Utah), test positive to virus

• Once the epicenter for the virus, China's Wuhan has for the primary time reported no new cases.

• Dow closed down 1,300 points on Wednesday with stocks hitting a 3 year low.

Pelosi calls on Trump to use Defense Production Act
House Speaker Nancy Pelosi called on President Trump Thursday morning to use the Defense Production Act powers that he invoked Wednesday, then again said later within the day he wasn't yet utilizing within the fight against the coronavirus.

“Right now, shortages of critical medical and private protective equipment are harming our ability to fight the coronavirus epidemic, endangering frontline workers and making it harder to worry for people who fall ill,” Pelosi said in an exceedingly statement.

“The President must immediately use the powers of the Defense Production Act to mass produce and coordinate distribution of those critical supplies, before the necessity worsens and also the shortages become even more dire. there's not on a daily basis to lose,” she said. “We must put more testing, more protective equipment and more ventilators into the hands of our frontline workers immediately.”

Coronavirus ravages 7 members of one New Jersey family, killing 3
Grace Fusco — mother of 11, grandmother of 27 — would sit within the same pew at church each Sunday, surrounded by nearly a dozen members of her sprawling Italian American family. Sunday dinners drew an excellent larger crowd to her point central New Jersey.

Now, her close-knit clan is united anew by unspeakable grief: Fusco, 73, died Wednesday night after contracting the coronavirus — hours after her son died from the virus and five days after her daughter’s death, a relative said.

Four other children who contracted coronavirus remain hospitalized, three of them in critical condition, the relative, Roseann Paradiso Fodera, said.

A deadly coronavirus mix in Florida: An aging population and much of young visitors
At the Florida community of The Villages, the retirement capital of America and also the place with the nation’s highest concentration of older people, only 33 people are tested for the coronavirus.

In the key, swamped with young spring breakers and travelers from round the world, just 16 people had been tested by Monday night. Ten of Florida’s 67 counties have tested nobody in any respect.

A disease that's deadly to the elderly and simply spread by the young has left Florida especially vulnerable. Yet faced with the prospect of dealing a shattering blow to an $86 billion tourism industry, Gov. Ron DeSantis has moved more slowly than another states to contain a plague that's spreading with alarming speed. Whole swaths of the state have yet to start robust testing, per state Department of Health data. And as a number of the beaches still swarmed with college revelers, the state refused to shut them.

How Korea trounced U.S. in race to check people for coronavirus
South Korea’s swift action stands in stark contrast to what has transpired within the u. s.. Seven weeks after the railway station meeting, the Koreans have tested brim over 290,000 people and identified over 8,000 infections. New cases are falling off: Ninety-three were reported Wednesday, down from a daily peak of 909 time period earlier.

The u. s., whose first case was detected the identical day as South Korea’s, isn't even near meeting demand for testing. About 60,000 tests are surpass public and personal labs in an exceedingly country of 330 million, federal officials said Tuesday.

Amid coronavirus outbreak, drive-in theaters unexpectedly find their moment

Drive-in theaters have long been viewed as an anachronistic diversion — perhaps merit an occasional visit, if that. Now, though, several among the country's 305 drive-in theaters are experiencing a surge in interest as traditional movie theaters, theme parks and other entertainment options are forced to shut due to governmental advisories designed to extend social distancing during the coronavirus outbreak.

In interviews with The l. a. Times, owners of drive-ins in California, Kansas, Oklahoma and Missouri said that they continue to be open, with several reporting increases in business in recent days. Operators said they were mindful of restrictions on large gatherings and would close if a mandate required them to try and do so.

Ticket sales Tuesday at the two-screen Paramount Drive-In were "at least double" what they typically would be, said Beau Bianchi, whose family has owned the ability in Paramount since 1946. In all, the drive-in — which offered a game on both of its screens — welcomed 136 cars and sold 320 tickets. The family's neighboring 11-screen indoor cineplex closed Sunday, but Bianchi said he expects business to still grow at the drive-in.

Comments