Canada Number cases of COVID-19 in Toronto has increased over last three days

Canada Number cases of COVID-19 in Toronto has increased over last three days


Ontario’s regional health units are reporting their fourth consecutive day with quite 400 new COVID-19 cases because the rate of latest infections has continued to rise in recent days, consistent with the Star’s latest count.

The health units reported a complete of 26,260 confirmed and probable cases, including 2,113 deaths.

The total of 492 new confirmed and probable cases reported since an equivalent time Thursday was once more up from recent daily averages, a symbol the province-wide decline within the infection rate has reversed in recent days.

The recent increase in cases has not been felt equally across the province. The daily rate of latest COVID-19 has been largely flat within the GTA, outside of Toronto, this month, with about 125 new cases reported per day on the average . Likewise, the speed of latest infections has flattened call at remainder of the province, outside the GTA, with a mean of about 80 new cases reported per day since May 10.

New cases have spiked in the week in Toronto; the town is seeing among the very best levels of latest case reports since the start of the pandemic.

The 194 cases reported per day on the average over the last seven days in Toronto is merely less than the amount the town saw for a brief period in mid-April, when the epidemic was peaking within the province.


The high case counts seen Friday came on another day during which the province completed far fewer COVID-19 tests than its target of 16,000 daily.

Earlier Friday, the province reported testing labs had completed just 11,276 tests the previous day, the fifth consecutive day below the target.

The province says the labs have the capacity to finish about 20,000 tests daily.

Last week, they completed as many as 18,354 tests during a day.

In the past, spikes just in case counts have followed days with high testing rates, and counts have dropped for days of low testing.

The number of latest cases reported every day was declining since hitting a peak of quite 700 in late April. However, the typical has begun to rise slightly, after flattening bent about 360 cases per day last week; before in the week , the province last saw quite 400 cases on May 8.

The 22 fatal cases reported within the province since Thursday morning was back in line with the recent decline. the speed of deaths is down considerably since it topped out at quite 90 deaths during a day earlier this month, about fortnight after the height within the daily case totals.

Because many health units publish tallies to their websites before reporting to Public Health Ontario, the Star’s count is more current than the info the province puts out each morning.

The province also reported 961 patients are now hospitalized with COVID-19, including 153 in medical care , of whom 120 are on a ventilator. These numbers are down slightly in recent days. The province also says nearly 19,000 patients who have tested positive for the coronavirus have now recovered from the disease. That’s about three-quarters of the entire infected.

The province says its data is accurate to 4 p.m. the previous day. The province also cautions its latest count of total deaths, 2,021, could also be incomplete or out of date thanks to delays within the reporting system. within the event of a discrepancy, “data reported by (the health units) should be considered the foremost up so far .”

The Star’s count includes some patients reported as “probable” COVID-19 cases. this suggests they need symptoms and contacts or travel history that indicate they very likely have the disease, but haven't yet received a positive lab test.

3:45 p.m. there have been 258 new cases of COVID-19 in Toronto, consistent with Dr. Eileen de Villa, medic of health for the town of Toronto.

De Villa said the amount of cases in Toronto has risen over the last three days, perhaps spurred by family gatherings, like Mother’s Day.

Asked by Francine Kopun of the Star why the town is reopening Toronto because the number of cases rises, de Villa said the key was to take care of a balance between protection from the virus and enabling people to urge out for other aspects of their overall health and for social and economic reasons.

Because the virus develops slowly, it’s important to follow Provincial directives that favourable data is seen over a period of two to four weeks.

“Please don't socialize in group settings, especially indoors,” said de Villa, of the upcoming weekend.

“It’s understandable people want to attach with loved ones.

“But we'd like to be very careful, so we will move forward,” not backwards, de Villa said.

She asked Torontonians to not socialize outside their households.

De Villa urged Torontonians with symptoms of COVID-19, which include nausea and abdominal pain, to urge tested at an assessment centre.

Increased testing will give the town a far better picture of where it's within the outbreak. But testing is best when a part of a technique . Such an approach must do three things: address current risk; address those at higher risk of contracting the virus; and test more broadly.

De Villa said TPH is teaming up with the Registered Nurses Association of Ontario (RNAO) to rent local RNs to assist with testing.

Speaking of the urgent need for financial help for Toronto from the federal and provincial governments, Mayor John Tory said he had heard encouraging words from them.

“But encouraging words don't buy anything,” Tory said.

The mayor said Toronto faced a financial hit of between $1.5 billion and $2.8 billion.

Asked if a rise to land tax was within the offing, Tory said residents shouldn’t face tax hikes or service cuts once they are hit by the coronavirus crisis.

3:45 p.m.: Toronto Mayor John Tory, Dr. Eileen de Villa, and Toronto fire marshal Matthew Pegg, will brief reporters at 3:45 p.m. A livestream of the press conference is out there at thestar.com.

2:52 p.m.: Manitoba health officials are reporting two new COVID-19 cases, bringing the entire of probable and confirmed infections within the province to 292.

The two new cases involve a boy under 10 and a lady in her 30s within the Winnipeg Regional Health Authority’s area.

They are the primary new cases in four days and, as more people recover, the amount of active cases within the province stands at 18.

Previously announced increases in crowd limits also are in effect.

Public gatherings that were limited to 10 people now leave up to 25 people at indoor events and 50 people outside.

Professional sports athletes, coaches and trainers also can attend team facilities for practices, as long as no members of the general public are allowed.

2:33 p.m.: Air Canada is revising its cancellation policy amid mounting customer frustration, offering travellers the choice of a voucher with no expiry date or discount Aeroplan points if the airline cancels their flight thanks to the COVID-19 pandemic.

The airline says the new policy — the previous one capped travel vouchers at 24 months — applies to non-refundable tickets issued up to the top of June, with an ingenious travel date between March 1 and June 30.

Air Canada’s new tack comes as advocates and thousands of passengers still demand their a refund for services they purchased but haven't received.

Three petitions with quite 77,000 signatures are calling for full refunds to be implemented before aid is handed bent airlines, two of which were presented to the House of Commons over the past 11 days.

None of Canada’s major airlines are offering to return cash to passengers for the many thousands of flight cancellations since mid-March, opting instead for vouchers — typically with a timeline of two years.

Pressed on the difficulty Thursday at his daily media conference, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau said the govt will check out the difficulty further.

2:27 p.m.: Quebec is reporting 65 new COVID-19 deaths today, bringing the entire to three ,865.

Deputy premier Genevieve Guilbault said Quebec has 46,141 confirmed cases of COVID-19, a rise of 646, with 13,819 people recovered.

She says the province has 1,479 people in hospital with the virus, a decrease of 25 patients.

Culture Minister Nathalie Roy announced that libraries, museums and drive-in movie theatres can reopen across the province as of May 29.

She says that in libraries, book and document lending are going to be the sole services allowed to reopen, and therefore the public won’t be ready to circulate beyond the lending counters.

Roy adds that by June 1, recording studios can reopen and indoor shows can once more be filmed and recorded as long as there are not any audience members.

2:06 p.m.: With warm weather expected all weekend, the town of Vaughan is reminding citizens that each one park amenities — including playgrounds, sports fields, tennis and basketball courts, dog parks and benches — remain closed due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

Congregating in parks and other public spaces while physical distancing measures are in effect isn't permitted. Those walking through parks and open trails must occupy least two metres faraway from others.

Different cities across the GTA have different rules regarding the utilization of park amenities.

1:30 p.m.: Premier Doug Ford says testing are going to be done again in Ontario long-term care homes this weekend also as retirement homes. Insists they're “ramping up” testing whilst the numbers are dropping in the week . “I’m just on these numbers constantly, pushing the system.”

1:27 p.m.: Edward Island is reporting no new cases of COVID-19 today. The province has had 27 cases, and every one are recovered.

The province is moving to subsequent phase of its Renew PEI Together plan. Indoor gatherings of up to 5 people and outdoor gatherings of no quite 10 people from different households are now allowed.

Retail businesses can open once they are ready.

1:17 p.m.: Opposition Leader Andrew Scheer called Friday for Parliament to be declared an important service so a reduced number of MPs can resume their House of Commons duties amid the COVID-19 crisis.

The Conservatives are proposing a motion to try to to that because Scheer said the daily briefings by Prime Minister Justin Trudeau from his home aren't ok to carry the govt accountable.

MPs got to be ready to ask questions on behalf of their constituents across the country, Scheer said.

1:03 p.m.: Newfoundland and Labrador is permitting outdoor games of tennis to resume immediately and can allow pet grooming services to start operating again on Monday.

Dr. Janice Fitzgerald, chief medic of health, said today the province continues to record no new cases of COVID-19.

It has been quite fortnight since Newfoundland and Labrador recorded any new cases of the disease from the novel coronavirus.

Fitzgerald says tennis players will need to bring their own equipment to the court, and not share it.

She adds that pet grooming companies will need to ensure their employees have personal protective equipment.

Fitzgerald says overnight camping are going to be permitted when the province moves from the present alert level of 4 , to level three, but she didn’t say when which will occur.

1 p.m.: Premier Doug Ford is addressing reporters at his daily briefing. A livestream of his press conference is out there at thestar.com

12:51 p.m.: New Brunswick moved into subsequent phase of its COVID-19 recovery plan on Friday, allowing barbers and hair stylists to reopen while permitting people to expand their social “bubbles” to incorporate close friends and family.

The “yellow level” of the province’s recovery plan, to be unrolled piecemeal over subsequent several weeks, will eventually allow churches, gyms, bowling alleys and yoga studios to reopen their doors.

“We have all been a neighborhood of achieving this, and that i want to thank all New Brunswickers for the continued co-operation and patience,” Premier Blaine Higgs said.

Starting Friday, non-regulated medical services along side personal service businesses like beauty salons and tattoo parlours are going to be allowed to reopen. More businesses and services will resume in waves over subsequent few weeks.

12:15 p.m.: Nova Scotia has identified two new cases of COVID-19, bringing the entire of confirmed cases to 1,048.

In the daily report, the province said the Northwood long-term care facility in Halifax — where 52 of the province’s 58 deaths have occurred — currently has 16 residents and 4 staff with active cases.

Northwood, the most important long-term care home east of Montreal, has been the location of Nova Scotia’s worst outbreak.

Eight people in Nova Scotia are in hospital with COVID-19, and there are four people in medical care being treated for the illness.

The province says 961 people of the 1,048 cases have now recovered.

12 p.m.: does one need to wipe down your groceries after every purchase? Microbiology expert Dr. Dasantila Golemi-Kotra answers your questions over subsequent hour on the way to stay safe and stop the spread of COVID-19. Join the conversation here.

11:55 a.m.: Mosques across Ontario try to salvage Eid celebrations as best they will during the COVID-19 pandemic, with some choosing drive-thru gift handouts while others decide to lead congregants in online prayers.

Eid al-Fitr may be a celebration that comes at the top of Ramadan — the month within the Islamic calendar where Muslims round the world forego food and drink from sunrise to sunset. This year, it starts after the last fast on Saturday and is widely known on Sunday morning.

Usually, hundreds and thousands of Muslims crowd into neighbourhood mosques or gather at parks for a congregational prayer and sermon before embracing with others and visiting homes for food and drink throughout the day.

That won’t be the case this year, therefore the Islamic Society of North America plans handy out about 1,000 gifts to families during a drive-thru celebration at its mosque in Mississauga, Ont.

11:50 a.m. (updated): Ontario’s regional health units are reporting another 24-hour period with quite 400 new COVID-19 cases after 10 straight days below that mark, consistent with the Star’s latest count.

As of 11 a.m. Friday, the health units had reported a complete of 25,826 confirmed and probable cases, including 2,091 deaths.

The total of 415 new confirmed and probable cases reported since an equivalent time Thursday was once more up from recent daily averages, another sign a provincewide decline in infections since has slowed, or maybe reversed in recent days.

Post a comment

0 Comments